Fraser Trevor Fraser Trevor Author
Title: We who have been neglected or abused as children “probably had no healthy way of learning about our bodies.”
Author: Fraser Trevor
Rating 5 of 5 Des:
We who have been neglected or abused as children “probably had no healthy way of learning about our bodies.” Most of us have neither a str...
We who have been neglected or abused as children “probably had no healthy way of learning about our bodies.” Most of us have neither a strong sense of self nor a keen sense of the connection between the internal and the external. In YOGA & TRAUMA support sessions, We are  invited to pendular between movement and rest, between interception (sensations in the body) and exteroception (stimuli outside the body). For example, We might guide through an exploration of the left hand, noticing every muscle and movement, and then ask us to stop, rest, and feel. And then ask us to bring our attention to our ears, noticing any sounds we hear. An exercise like this reminds us that we can feel something deeply and shift the focus, coming out of discomfort, anytime we want.

Moving from one asana to another, slowly and deliberately, encourages us to stay with sensation and notice what’s happening in our bodies, and to approach each movement with a sense of curiosity. The simplest of poses (standing or sitting in a chair) can produce profound results. Just feeling our feet on the floor for the very first time gave one agitated survivor a sense of balance, stability, and safety. For us, who dissociated from our body and felt numb, doing gentle supported backbends began to wake up our body and get the blood flowing. Building a strong, capable body goes a long way toward developing a strong, centred mind.

No matter what poses survivors choose to do—or how much they experiment with the breathing exercises—they benefit from knowing that each exercise comes to an end, that they won’t get stuck in emotional overwhelm. A pose might feel uncomfortable, a round of pranayama might bring up feelings they would much rather stuff back down, but the sensations are temporary, only around until the next posture or the next exhalation.


Western medicine doesn't give us many tools to "master our own physiology."

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