Fraser Trevor Fraser Trevor Author
Title: Issues for the survivor of Dissociation Addiction Disorders, if they are entering traditional treatment for addiction or AA
Author: Fraser Trevor
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Issues for the survivor of Dissociation Addiction Disorders, if they are entering traditional treatment for addiction or AA, is that many ...
Issues for the survivor of Dissociation Addiction Disorders, if they are entering traditional treatment for addiction or AA, is that many of the methods used are counter productive. Angry, forceful confrontations that are frequently used to break denial can push those with abusive backgrounds further into resistance, because they feel they're being violated again. The whole powerlessness concept is threatening because they were unable to control what was done to them as a child so it's terrifying to think they have no power as an adult. The structure and tone of treatment and AA tends to be punitive, shaming, rigid and blaming, which resembles the atmosphere they grew up in. Traditional treatment methods often make the survivor of abuse feel re-victimised.

Considering the fact that the majority of people entering treatment for addiction have been abused, this gives us another clear indication as to why traditional treatment is not successful for so many people. It is our opinion that those survivors who do feel comfortable in AA and traditional treatment do so because,  one of the most common effects of child abuse leaves survivors of abuse unconsciously drawn to situations and people that simulate their dysfunctional family system. It's familiar to them. On some level they feel comfortable in AA and yet on another level it incites great internal conflict. That was the case for us and the longer we stayed sober and the deeper we worked on our childhood abuse issues, the more uncomfortable we became with certain aspects of AA. Treatment for alcoholism and drug addiction needs to empower the individual and that is not the case with AA and mainstream rehabilitation centres.

It's also important to note here that although we're talking specifically about the effects of child abuse and neglect, that any high-stress, traumatic event in life has the potential to alter and damage the body's stress response system and brain chemistry. Other events like natural disasters, kidnapping, civilians in war or those engaging in combat, prisoners of war, a car wreck, plane wreck, a terrorist attack, chronic health conditions, domestic violence, unhealthy relationships or other similar scenarios where someone is in crises, traumatised and unable to escape or forced to live with ongoing stress could have the same results and make one vulnerable to addiction.

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